Conflicted Childhoods in R.K. Narayan’s Swami and Friends

“I am beginning to feel of late that I have Delirium”                                                                                (Narayan 167) When it comes to the narratives centred around a juvenile consciousness evolving during colonial India, there are only a few and fewer amongst those who have done justice to it. Children, irrespective of the temporal and spatial bounds have been treated as … Continue reading Conflicted Childhoods in R.K. Narayan’s Swami and Friends

Why I feel marginalised as a children’s writer and publishing professional

Meghaa Gupta In 2021, I had the privilege of being shortlisted for an award celebrating women writers. Much has been said about the historical neglect of women in virtually every walk of life, including writing. However, as a woman working in children’s publishing, I can hardly recall a time when I felt discriminated because of … Continue reading Why I feel marginalised as a children’s writer and publishing professional

Some Excerpts from our first Conference: Narratives of Criminality, Punishment and Social Justice in CYA Literature

Text by Ritwika Roy & Kajori Patra Illustrations by Ahona Das When we started ACLiSA in 2021, we did not imagine that we would be holding our first conference in August 2022, within a year of functioning. Yet, when Ritwika, one of our co-founders, proposed to the team that we collaborate with the Department of … Continue reading Some Excerpts from our first Conference: Narratives of Criminality, Punishment and Social Justice in CYA Literature

My adventures and misadventures as a young adult writing for other young adults.

By Samragngi Roy Disclaimer: I shall begin with a rant so I can conclude on a happy note.  So, here's the unfiltered truth about the self-publishing industry in India. If I said that what I experienced as a self-published young adult author was rather unpleasant, it would be an understatement. It was traumatic! A nightmare! … Continue reading My adventures and misadventures as a young adult writing for other young adults.

Two suicide poets and Children’s Literature

By Shreya Banerjee “Childhood is the geometric place of all nostalgias”                      -Jean-Claude Brisseau’s On Sunday Afternoon (1966) There are as many variations of childhood, as there are children in the world. A child’s orientation to their particular contexts are inflected upon by various social, political and economic factors. For instance, the boyhood/girlhood of a child … Continue reading Two suicide poets and Children’s Literature